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2018 World Cup: The stats that speak

These are the statistics for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, which took place in Russia from 14 June to 15 July 2018.
Goals scored from penalty shoot-outs are not counted, and matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.
Overall
Total number of goals scored: 169
Average goals per match: 2.64
Total number of braces: 10 
Edinson Cavani, Denis Cheryshev, Diego Costa, Eden Hazard, Harry Kane, Romelu Lukaku (2), Kylian Mbappé, Ahmed Musa, John Stones
Total number of hat-tricks: 2 
Harry Kane, Cristiano Ronaldo
Total number of penalty kicks awarded: 29
Total number of penalty kicks scored: 22 
Salman Al-Faraj, Karim Ansarifard, Artem Dzyuba, Andreas Granqvist (2), Antoine Griezmann (3), Eden Hazard, Mile Jedinak (2), Shinji Kagawa, Harry Kane (3), Luka Modrić, Victor Moses, Cristiano Ronaldo, Mohamed Salah, Ferjani Sassi, Gylfi Sigurðsson, Carlos Vela
Total number of penalty kicks missed or saved: 7 
Fahad Al-Muwallad, Christian Cueva, Lionel Messi, Luka Modrić, Cristiano Ronaldo, Bryan Ruiz, Gylfi Sigurðsson
Penalty kick success rate: 75.86%
Own goals scored: 12 
Edson Álvarez, Aziz Behich, Aziz Bouhaddouz, Denis Cheryshev, Thiago Cionek, Oghenekaro Etebo, Ahmed Fathy, Fernandinho, Sergei Ignashevich, Mario Mandžukić, Yassine Meriah, Yann Sommer
Timing
First goal of the tournament: Yury Gazinsky for Russia against Saudi Arabia
First brace of the tournament: Denis Cheryshev for Russia against Saudi Arabia
First hat-trick of the tournament: Cristiano Ronaldo for Portugal against Spain
Last goal of the tournament: Mario Mandžukić for Croatia against France
Last brace of the tournament: Edinson Cavani for Uruguay against Portugal
Last hat-trick of the tournament: Harry Kane for England against Panama
Fastest goal in a match from kickoff: 1st minute
Fastest goal in a match after coming on as a substitute: 1st minute
Latest goal in a match without extra time: 90+7th minute
Latest goal in a match with extra time: 115th minute
Latest winning goal in a match without extra time: 90+5th minute 
Aziz Bouhaddouz (own goal) for Iran against Morocco, Toni Kroos for Germany against Sweden, Salem Al-Dawsari for Saudi Arabia against Egypt
Latest winning goal in a match with extra time: 109th minute
Shortest time difference between two goals scored by the same team in a match: 3 minutes 
Diego Costa and Nacho for Spain against Portugal
Teams
Most goals scored by a team: 16 
Belgium
Fewest goals scored by a team: 2 
Australia, Costa Rica, Egypt, Germany, Iceland, Iran, Morocco, Panama, Peru, Poland, Saudi Arabia, Serbia
Most goals conceded by a team: 11 
Panama
Fewest goals conceded by a team: 2 
Denmark, Iran, Peru
Best goal difference: +10 
Belgium
Worst goal difference: -9 
Panama
Most goals scored in a match by both teams: 7 
Belgium 5–2 Tunisia, England 6–1 Panama, France 4–3 Argentina
Most goals scored in a match by one team: 6 
England against Panama
Most goals scored in a match by the losing team: 3 
Argentina against France
Biggest margin of victory: 5 goals 
Russia 5–0 Saudi Arabia, England 6–1 Panama
Most clean sheets achieved by a team: 4 
France
Fewest clean sheets achieved by a team: 0 
Argentina, Australia, Costa Rica, Egypt, Germany, Iceland, Japan, Morocco, Panama, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Switzerland, Tunisia
Most clean sheets given by an opposing team: 2 
Costa Rica, England, Germany, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, Saudi Arabia
Fewest clean sheets given by an opposing team: 0 
Brazil, Colombia, Croatia, Portugal, Spain, Tunisia
Most consecutive clean sheets achieved by a team: 3 
Brazil, Uruguay
Most consecutive clean sheets given by an opposing team: 2 
Costa Rica, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, Saudi Arabia
Individual
Most goals scored by an individual: 6 
Harry Kane 
Most assists provided by an individual: 2 
Éver Banega, Nacer Chadli, Viktor Claesson, Philippe Coutinho, Kevin De Bruyne, Artem Dzyuba, Aleksandr Golovin, Antoine Griezmann, Eden Hazard, Lucas Hernández, Lionel Messi, Thomas Meunier, Juan Fernando Quintero, James Rodríguez, Carlos Andrés Sánchez, Youri Tielemans 
Most goals and assists produced by an individual: 6 
Antoine Griezmann (4 goals, 2 assists), Harry Kane (6 goals) 
Most clean sheets achieved by a goalkeeper: 3 
Alisson, Thibaut Courtois, Hugo Lloris, Fernando Muslera, Robin Olsen 
Most consecutive clean sheets achieved by a goalkeeper: 3 
Alisson, Fernando Muslera 
Most goals scored by one player in a match: 3 
Harry Kane for England against Panama, Cristiano Ronaldo for Portugal against Spain
Oldest goal scorer: 37 years, 120 days 
Felipe Baloy for Panama against England 
Youngest goal scorer: 19 years, 183 days 
Kylian Mbappé for France against Peru
Wins and losses
Most wins: 6 – Belgium, France 
Fewest wins: 0 – Australia, Costa Rica, Egypt, Iceland, Morocco, Panama 
Most losses: 3 – Egypt, England, Panama 
Fewest losses: 0 – Denmark, France, Spain 
Most draws: 3 – Denmark, Spain 
Fewest draws: 0 – Belgium, Egypt, Germany, Mexico, Nigeria, Panama, Peru, Poland, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, South Korea, Sweden, Tunisia, Uruguay 
Most points in the group stage: 9 – Belgium, Croatia, Uruguay 
Fewest points in the group stage: 0 – Egypt, Panama
Players
Appearance record: Rafael Márquez  Mexico participated in the World Cup for the fifth time, equaling the record of compatriot Antonio Carbajal and Germany player Lothar Matthäus
Oldest player: At 45 years and five months, Essam El-Hadary  Egypt is the oldest player ever to be nominated for a World Cup finals. By his use in the last group match on June 25, he was 45 years and 161 days, thereby becoming the oldest World Cup player.[68]
Youngest player: Daniel Arzani  Australia is the youngest player at the age of 19 years and 163 days. He came on in the group match against France in the 84th minute.[69]
Sofyan Amrabat  Morocco, who came on as a substitute for his brother Nordin Amrabat in the 76th minute in the group match against Iran, is the first player in World Cup history to come in for his brother.[67]
Aleksandr Yerokhin  Russia is the first player to feature as the fourth substitute player in a World Cup match – coming on in the 97th minute of extra time in the Round of 16 match against Spain. This match is also the first ever World Cup match in which eight players have been substituted.[70]
30 teams nominated at least one player from the domestic league, but only England exclusively fielded players of its own domestic league.[71] By contrast, Sweden and Senegal nominated only players from foreign leagues.
The most number of players (129) are active in clubs based in England, the majority of them in the Premier League, with some in the lower leagues. In total 27 of the 32 team squads have players who play in England.
One player each plays in the leagues of Finland, Guinea, Honduras, Norway, Paraguay, Romania, Slovakia and South Africa.
From the leagues of countries that did not qualify, the Italian Serie A have the strongest representation with 58 players.
Discipline
Total number of yellow cards: 219 
Average yellow cards per match: 3.42 
Total number of red cards: 4 
Average red cards per match: 0.06 
First yellow card of the tournament:
Aleksandr Golovin for Russia against Saudi Arabia 
First red card of the tournament:
Carlos Sánchez Moreno for Colombia against Japan 
Fastest yellow card from kick off: 1st minute 
Fastest yellow card after coming on as a substitute: 1st minute 
Latest yellow card in a match without extra time: 90+8th minute 
Aleksandar Prijović for Serbia against Costa Rica, Cédric Soares for Portugal against Iran 
Latest yellow card in a match with extra time: 118th minute 
Fastest dismissal from kick off: 3rd minute 
Latest dismissal in a match without extra time: 90+4th minute 
Shortest time difference between two yellow cards given to the same player: 9 minutes 
Igor Smolnikov for Russia against Uruguay (booked in the 27th minute and again in the 36th minute) 
Most yellow cards (team): 15 
Croatia 
Most red cards (team): 1 
Colombia, Germany, Russia, Switzerland 
Fewest yellow cards (team): 1 
Saudi Arabia 
Most yellow cards (player): 3 
Sebastian Larsson 
Most red cards (player): 1 
Jérôme Boateng, Michael Lang, Carlos Sánchez Moreno, Igor Smolnikov 
Most yellow cards (match): 8 
Belgium vs Panama, France vs Argentina, Colombia vs England 
Most red cards (match): 1 
Colombia vs Japan, Germany vs Sweden, Uruguay vs Russia, Sweden vs Switzerland 
Fewest yellow cards (match): 0 
Argentina vs Iceland, Uruguay vs Saudi Arabia 
Most cards in one match: 8 yellow cards 
Belgium vs Panama, France vs Argentina, Colombia vs England
Coaches
Oldest coach: Óscar Tabárez  Uruguay – 71 years and 104 days in the first game against Egypt, after Otto Rehhagel (71 years and 317 days at the 2010 World Cup), he is the second oldest World Cup coach.[67]
Youngest coach: Aliou Cissé  Senegal – 42 years and 87 days in the first game against Poland.
Country with most coaches:  Argentina with four coaches, alongside Argentina, Egypt, Colombia and Peru are coached by Argentines. This is followed by  Spain with three coaches (Belgium, Saudi Arabia and Spain), then Germany, France, Colombia (with the Colombian coaches serving only other teams as in 2014) and Portugal with two coaches each.
Teams with foreign coaches: Twelve teams are trained by foreign coaches, including two teams (Australia and Denmark) of coaches whose home countries (Netherlands and Norway) did not qualify for the 2018 World Cup.
Longest serving coach: As in 2014, the longest serving team coaches of the World Cup are Joachim Löw and Óscar Tabárez, who have been in charge of the German and Uruguayan national teams since 2006. Tabárez, however, was previously coach of Uruguay from 1988 to 1990, while Löw have worked as an assistant coach for Germany since 2004. Besides them, Didier Deschamps  France, José Pékerman  Colombia and Carlos Queiroz  Iran were at the 2014 World Cup with their current teams and Jorge Sampaoli  Argentina with Chile and Fernando Santos  Portugal with Greece at the 2014 World Cup.
Shortest serving coach: The coach having the shortest time in charge is Fernando Hierro  Spain, who became in charge only two days before his team’s first game. In addition to him were Mladen Krstajić  Serbia, Bert van Marwijk  Australia, Akira Nishino  Japan and Juan Antonio Pizzi  Saudi Arabia who resumed duty as coach only after the successful qualification of their current teams. Of these, however, van Marwijk had qualified with Saudi Arabia for the World Cup, but then refused to renew his contract.
Coaches who were former players: Didier Deschamps (France / 1998) became world champion having previously contested as a player, equaling the record of Mário Zagallo and Franz Beckenbauer). Beside him, Aliou Cissé (Senegal / 2002), Gareth Southgate (England / 1998), Óscar Ramírez (Costa Rica / 1990), Adam Nawałka (Poland / 1978), Stanislav Cherchesov (Russia / 1994 and unused in 2002) and Mladen Krstajić (Serbia / 2006 with Serbia & Montenegro) were also coaches who previously played at the World Cup.
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